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Morning Joe

News/Business. Interviews with newsmakers and politicians; host Joe Scarborough. New.

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03:00:00

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San Francisco, CA, USA

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Virtual Ch. 787 (MSNBC HD)

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mpeg2video

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ac3

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1920

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1080

TOPIC FREQUENCY

Israel 49, Us 29, United States 19, U.s. 17, Iran 16, Syria 14, Barack Obama 12, New York 11, Washington 10, Cyprus 7, Sheryl 6, Bennett 5, Kathleen Sebelius 5, Sheryl Sandberg 5, Mika 5, Cia 5, Richard Haass 5, America 5, Usaa 4, Campbell Brown 4,
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  MSNBC    Morning Joe    News/Business. Interviews with newsmakers  
   and politicians; host Joe Scarborough. New.  

    March 21, 2013
    3:00 - 6:00am PDT  

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i'm your hot water heater. you hardly know i exist. that's too bad. 'cuz if my pressure relief valve gets stuck... [ booooooom! ] ...we hot water heaters can transform into rocket propelled wrecking balls. and if you got the wrong home insurance coverage, it's your bank account that might explode. so get allstate. [ dennis ] good hands. good home. make sure you have the right home protection. talk to an allstate agent. at the top of the show we asked you why are you awake? john tower, the answers, please? >> we have dawn.
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bill, glad to see you at the "way too early" high table. tyson writes, is barnicle supposed to be sitting next to you? he isn't doing anything. >> you see, tyson, grandpa barnicle wanders before "morning joe." we never know where he is going to end up. thank goodness this time he was fully dressed. we'll see you tomorrow. "morning joe" starts right now. >> what went wrong? why are we further away from a two-state solution? i'm curious. what do you believe went wrong? did you push israel too hard? mr. prime minister, i want to help out my colleague over here. do you accept the president's understanding that iran is a year away when it comes to nuclear weapons? another question i had for you -- >> chuck, how many do you got? do you guys do this in the israel press? you say you get one question and you add like five? you see how the young lady from
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channel 1, she had one question. >> these are commuter questions. reiterations. >> i thought i had five. i get four questions, right? >> look. this is not a kosher question but don't hog it. >> that is pretty funny, actually. welcome to "morning joe." thursday, march 21st. with us is mike barnicle. >> i can't believe he is here! >> i know. jump fences and stuff. >> you can't imagine. >> you had a flat tire in the mid-town tunnel. >> yeah. >> that's not good. >> when did that happen? >> just now. seven minutes ago. never knew i could sprint that fast. >> did you fix the tire yourself like the indy 500? >> i whipped out my tire fixing kit and like a daytona crew. >> we are sort of glad you're here. the president of council on
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foreign relations, richard haass is with us as well. a lot to get to this morning. we have some fascinating stories. >> how about chuck todd asking 87 questions? >> aggressive. >> i like it. good question about passover, you get four questions. >> it was good. >> i like it. you get your chance, take it. >> okay. we will start there actually. president obama touched down in the west bank city of ramallah this morning and great by president abbas of the palestinian authority kicking off the second leg of his four-day visit to the middle east. today, the israel army confirmed four rockets were fired from the gaza strip landing in southern israel and causing some damage. the rocket strike, which has not been claimed by any palestinian militant group, is the second violation of the cease-fire that ended the clash between the hamas and israel this past november. yesterday, the president's meeting with israel prime minister benjamin netanyahu focused on another threat to israel in the region.
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it runs nuclear ambitions. >> we agree that a nuclear armed iran would be a threat to the region, a threat to the world, and potentially an threat to israel. all options are on the table. we will do what is necessary to prevent iran from getting the world's worst weapons. >> richard, help somebody out at home who is watching this. the president of the united states goes into hamas and allies decide to fire missiles into israel which they do all the time. can you explain why they would act and continue to act in a way that is against their best interests? >> for groups like hamas, you know, their title represents what they are. they are the islamic resistant movement. this for he them is station identification. this is the way that they essentially say we have a better path for dealing with the israelis. >> no peace? no peace? >> well, peace -- not a negotiated peace. certainly not a peace on the terms of being discussed by israel or the united states.
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>> not a peace that recognizes israel -- >> hamas a not gotten there supposedly. you have a divided palestinian world and one of the reasons connected to the trip that the president is not putting these issues at the center of things. you got the palestinians is divided and egypt is run by the muslim brotherhood who knows what is happening in jordan and you have a new israel government elected not to make peace or more but simply deal with the orthodox in the israel society. this is the most unripe situation for diplomacy any american president has walked into. >> mike, this american president, i think, has bent over backwards to be an honest broker between the israelis and palestinians and he did so in a way that actually angered the israelis. so hamas launches rockets into israel while the president is there and what do they do? they actually push away a guy
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that, again, is trying to be an honest broker. >> yeah, he has tried to be an honest broker and paid a price to it to some extent in domestic politics. what do you think of the theory, it's more than a theory, i would guess, that this trip is based largely less on policy than the president's personality, convincing the israelis and the israeli government that i am your friend. the united states is your friend. we are not going to falter or hesitate or anything when it comes to the defense of israel. >> i don't think he is aiming so much to the israeli government but the israeli government. this time the president shows up. he is stronger and just won re-election and netanyahu is weaker. had he a weak showing in the elect shu and had trouble forming a government, so the president is going over his head. he wants to begin a dialogue with the israeli people and show the united states is a friend of israel and show also that israel taking more risks for peace than
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netanyahu has been willing to support is a good idea. this is the beginning of a long conversation. >> all right. here with us now from jerusalem, nbc chief foreign affairs correspondent, andrea mitchell. given all we have talked about and the constraints and years this has been in the making what is the white house hoping to accomplish on this trip? >> they have accomplished already what they hope to accomplish and do more with the speech today, reaching over the heads, as you've just been pointing out, to the israeli people and especially to israeli youth. but one of the blogs on the jerusalem post today was, he has us at shalom. his first words on getting off air force one. then he takes off his jacket. so netanyahu has to take off his jacket. they walk buddy buddy across the tarmac. he goes and looks at the iron dome which the u.s. paid for which is one of the successful antimissile defenses and some arguments over the teblchnology
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but the israelis view it as protecting itself from the rockets in gaza. there is so much symbolism here. the friendliness and a blog this is operation desert smooch. he is here covering it as well. you could not believe the buddy system. these are the two figures, the israeli and american leaders, who have been most at lagger heads of any combination since, you know, reagan and began. yet this new relationship, this new start has really worked so far. what some israeli commentators are writing is the israeli people really have to wake up to the fact that they cannot be an armed camp and they have to deal with the palestinian issue. >> andrew, it's john heilemann here. >> hi, njohn. >> so much scratchiness between
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obama and netanyahu the last four years. an event in the u.s. campaign where netanyahu more or less endorsed mitt romney for president. how much of the loathe that is coming from b.b. towards our president is kind of him trying to make sure that he has not done long-term damage to the relationship in that direction? we know what barack obama's objectives here are but it it seems to me netanyahu is making up for any hurt feelings he did over last summer. >> absolutely. there is a political balance here. if you can see the see-saw right now. netanyahu is weaker than re-elected barack obama. they need each other. but israel needs the u.s. to have its back, both because of syria, the civil war next door, the possibility of chemical weapons which would be, as the president said, a real game-changer, though, i'm told that they have no evidence that chemical weapons were used by the regime. the president is very clear that
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it would not have been used by the opposition. that was fallacious argument from the regime but no hard evidence they were used. if it were used, it would be a game-changer. but israel needs the u.s. for iran and they do seem to be coming closer together on the time line of iran and it's very clear, from what the president said, that he would support military action and he is not bluffing. >> richard haass, i can only say this thinking like a politician thinks and it doesn't matter what level you are. you're always a politician. i would be getting on the phone with barack obama and saying, listen, you want me to push back on iran and you want to tell me the red line is a year or 18 months from now instead of -- i tell you what, this is what is going to happen. if you don't want us to go in, i need you over here and i need you standing next to me and i need you assuring my people that you are on my side, that you are on israel's side, and so we look
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forward to having you over here. i really do -- personally, no evidence. i really think this has so much to do with netanyahu saying, okay, you want me to really keep delaying things? >> it's actually half that. for israel prime minister, the single most important thing you've got to do to remain popular in israel is shows that you can manage israel most important bilateral relationship, the relationship with the united states. netanyahu mismanaged this relationship. he essentially endorsed mitt romney. the balance of power between the two has shifted in barack obama's direction. the most interesting substantive thing to happen yesterday besides the comment on syria is essentially the time lines -- >> but barack obama doesn't go to the capitol until it's in his best interest. why would he go to israel unless he was being told he needed to come over there because of iran? >> well, on iran, he got netanyahu to essentially move much closer to his time line.
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they push the issue into 2014 yesterday. i think the lead story out of yesterday. he got the help there. barack obama banked something yesterday. he invested, if you will, he met b.b. halfway when he didn't have to and it will help him in the long run in managing this relationship. this relationship has changed the last couple of months because of the political fortunes of b.b. went down or barack obama went up. so barack obama was gracious. he went there but in the funny sort of way it shifted. >> as much as the israel relationship is important to the united states, it is the case that we are the dominant partner in this bilateral relationship always because of the security we led israel and amount of foreign aid we give israel and the defense cooperation, all of that stuff. so it seems to me at least what has changed is that as much as barack obama needs israel and the way joe said israel needs the united states to be standing four square against iran and going into the future. that's a play, a need that
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netanyahu clearly has as you pointed out what the israel public wants from him. >> the most confrontational i remember is george bush the father and several months later -- israel people said we can't afford that kind to be between our two governments. each side needs the other. right now, i think it's shifted somewhat. >> all right. thanks so much, andrea. what is on the calendar today? >> the president is going to be giving this major speech today. he is in ramallah now, as you know. he gives a major speech. he had a fascinating high tech sort of walk-through with the israelis and a lot of interesting developments on the growing economy here, the technology sector. we will have jeff goldberg and host of "meet the press" in the united states, david gregory and "meet the press" from here, dana weiss. we have a pretty jam-packed
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show. >> wonderful. andrea mitchell, thanks very much. the white house is work, on shifting over side of its lethal drone program from the cia to the military. according to the "the wall street journal." the move would make the controversial program subject to international law. strikes would be undertaken with the consent of host governments, while many in washington believe the program will be more effective under the cia, the proposal reflects a growing consensus it needs to be on legal, sturdier footing. yesterday the senate kicked off hearings. senators on both sides expressed concerns over privacy. some members are mulling possible federal regulations. the faa estimates 30,000 drones could be flying in the u.s. skies in the next 20 years and richard haass is shaking his head. it's impossible to consider. >> i think the white house was caught by surprise by the
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bipartisan pushback by the drone program. 30,000 drones? this is a new world we are unprepared for. this is a wild west, if you will, in the skies. >> the great news for law enforcement officers the ability to have a bird's-eye view over neighborhoods that have been problematic and dangerous in the past, but there are so many concerns also about civil liberties. quite a balancing act. two more. despite promises to close down guantanamo bay. >> he is going to do that his first year after he is inaugurated. >> isn't it already closed? >> no. 2010, january 20th, 2010. he promised that during the entire campaign. >> 2008, you mean? >> 2008. >> but he promised a year from the day i'm sworn in, which would have been january 20th, ten. i'm going to close gitmo because it represents everything that is wrong with the united states of
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america. george w. bush and dick cheney shredding the constitution. >> they did. it's kind of hard to undo that. >> however, we would never do such a thing. here is some scotch tape. seriously, if if it is so immoral, you close gitmo. >> really some what do you do? >> you close gitmo is what you do. >> okay. that would be -- >> if the united states gets into office and he realizes that it violates our most basic constitutional principles as a people, you don't ask what the costs are. you do it. but as mike barnicle said, he got the briefing. >> in chicago. >> in chicago. and it's called the o sh briefing for a reason, mike, isn't it? >> yeah. >> you find out you're not as smart as you thought you were when you're a state senator and then a two-year u.s. senator -- no, then a two-year u.s. senator running for president, a guy that really didn't do a lot of homework when i was in the u.s. senate and wasn't quite as smart as he thought he was when it
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came to this, was he? >> i think it would apply to anyone but this case it applied to the president elected to the united states. the day blagojevich was arrested in chicago and the president got his first full intelligence briefing and the code name for the briefing was holy cocka. he opened up the book and saw the first -- he went, whoa! >> that is only part of the story. the other part of the story you can say -- i agree that you make a promise like that, you should try to fulfill it. hold on! >> hold on. john, this is important. people say how could he say that? yes, every president goes into his job ignorant, right? but not all go in as self-righteous as this president did, condemning the past administration as being immoral and being enemies of the united states constitution. that's the point i'm drawing here. >> yes, and i take that point.
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>> i'm not sure he actually said that. >> my point it was something more implicated than the holy crap briefing which is the question of what to do with these people was a matter of politics. it's a matter of democracy. found out no support. very hard to figure out where you would put these people in the united states because you have to have the consent of states to allow those people to be housed in their states. without that consent you have a huge counundrum. >> if you're going to keep it, keep it nice. >> nobody knows what we are talking about. read the story. >> just fight over themselves, even though nothing to fight about. the u.s. is considering 150 million dollar overhaul of the guantanamo bay facility. the plans include a new hospital, guard barracks and dining hall. lawyers for the detainees unrest is growing and hunger strikes
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have recently tripled. >> an operating budget in guantanamo bay of 177 million. over 1 million for each of the 166 detainees. the obama administration says it's committed to closing gitmo efforts which have been repeatedly blocked by congress. >> not just blocked by congress. you can't just -- >> that's ridiculous. >> you're worried the people will get tortured and killed. >> no, back into action. >> you can't just release them. what it is -- we used to teach at the kennedy school when i was a professor there the difference. it seemed like a good idea at the time. the more people learned about it, they realize you try to do would make a bad situation worse. this is a good example of policy continuity -- >> hold on one second. $10 million. you don't have white house doors but $10 million being spent for
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a legal meeting complex where lawyers can meet. >> what are you for? opening it or closing it? >> you got the mlb -- >> i get they do have the mlb package! >> bob bowman did that for them. >> it's something. what else you got? >> i was going to talk about the pope but you went on too long. bantering about gitmo. >> what did the pope say? >> it's about sex. >> the pope is talking about sex? >> did he in a certain way and it's fascinating. it's a good conversation and i'm not going to waste it on the last 20 seconds of this block so we will save it. >> that's what you call a deep tease! that's a tv term! coming up on "morning joe," in two days we will celebrate the third anniversary of president obama signing his
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health care act into law. >> we will ask kathleen sebelius about that and she joins us later. campbell brown will be here and "the washington post" ezra klein. up next the top stories in the politico playbook. first, bill karins with a check on the forecast. no good news and another snowstorm moving across the country. most likely sunday into monday. let me show you the stark contrast between this start of spring and last year. last year at this point the blue on the map and the purple show you where the snow was. no snow pretty much east of the ms river and through the midwest. only 20% of the country this time last year was covered in know. look at the map currently. 30% of the lower 48 covered by snow and we have snow pack from maine tlhrough the great lakes and upstate and wisconsin and minnesota. the winds coming down from canada over the snow, it just doesn't have a chance to moderate and warm up.
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look how cold it was yesterday. high temperatures in the 20s in the great lakes. we should be almost near mid-40s to near 50 this time of the year. this morning is very cold once again from fargo to minneapolis, chicago, just another bitterly cold day out there and the winds over the central plains especially as long as we have the snow on the ground it's going to continue. be careful driving in connecticut this morning. a little coating of light snow out there. pretty much from westchester, new york, through areas of southern connecticut, that could produce 1 to 3 inches of snow later today in areas especially of southern rhode island and southeast portions of mass including the cape. the forecast, cold day in the new england area and light snow. new york city we saw snowflakes overnight but no problem around the big paeapple. you're watching "morning joe," brewed by starbucks. ♪ [ construction sounds ] ♪ [ watch ticking ] [ engine revs ]
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all right. 24 past the hour. time to take a look at the morning papers.
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"the new york times" fed chairman ben bernanke says the u.s. economy has shown improvement but the fed will continue stimulus unless convinced the gains are sustainable. the plans to keep key short-term interest rate near zero until the unemployment rate is below 6.5%. "the washington post," a plan in front of the senate would allow many more foreign workers with high skills to come to the u.s. unlimited number of students who are in graduate degrees from american colleges in science, tech, and math would be granted permanent legal status. that's great news. tech lobbyists had to pull a full-court press on d.c. arguing google and microsoft having a hard time finding qualified workers because of visa restrictions. the "los angeles times," jeff basa has recovered some of the f-1 engines to bring
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"apollo" to the moon. he recovered them after three weeks at sea working miles below the atlantic ocean. >> obviously, that is great news. >> yeah. >> like an explorer. >> the baton rouge advocate has nothing about chasing down rocket engines from 1969. the library of congress sound of satellite news center by simon and garfunkel and the twist by chubby checker. you are my sunshine by jimmy davis. it was chosen on local and artistic importance. >> workers must report their weight and body fat or face 600
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dollars in terms of health insurance premiums. >> let's go to happier news. did you see this, mike? >> i'm not sure that's fair. >> how about that? so "the tonight show" is coming to new york city. >> coming home. >> it is coming home. jimmy fallon is going to be taking over. >> they are building a larger studio firm upstairs in the studio that johnny carson performed in and the great steve allen. >> jimmy fallon, couldn't be a nicer guy. >> a nice guy. >> funny guy. >> great guy. >> a good move. >> it's a good move. >> one of the generational changes upon us. >> the. >> seriously if you think about kimmel and fallon. i think the only premier generation left is letterman. >> my generation?
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>> the geriatric old man. >> let's go to politico. i did have a mcdonald's story for you. >> he has done very well in the ratings. a little back and forth between him and the executives. you telling me if i compare my boss to snakes, you're saying that might hurt my career trajectory? >> it's not traditional. >> it is not a traditional matter, of course. >> okay. we will get to that later. bus is the chief white house correspondent for politico, mike allen is here with the morning playbook. mike, good morning. >> good morning, mika. >> in today's behind the curtain column you say the gop now belongs to senators marco rubio and rand paul. how so? >> you might as well call it the rand/rubio party, because the energy, the excitement and the
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power in the republican party is now outside washington and the clearest place to see this is on immigration. on the show in last couple of days we have seen senator rand paul moving toward friendliness of immigration reform and marco rubio in the past has expressed support for it. if they come out with tough, real immigration reform is how it will get to the president's desk. if they are for it, house republicans who are still reluctant are not going to want to get to the right of them. a sign of resistance there is still in the house, house republican that we talked to said there is a hispanics panic among the party elite donors and leaders and take senator paul and rubio to bring them along.
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>> hispanics paunnic? one way to put it. >> we have this brown guy running in georgia. he is the one that says barack obama follows the soviet constitution! >> soviet constitution? >> not even the russian constitution? >> this guy says that barack obama does not follow the united states constitution. he follows the soviet constitution! lots of luck with that, fellow! you say there are four guys from this delegation running. not all of them saying such things. and it's causing real problems in the georgia delegation because everybody wants to be senator there. >> that's right. this is why so many leaders in washington have been resisting the idea of these chaotic primaries and wanting washington to reach out and anoint somebody through endorsements and money and get one of these other candidates that is not talking about a soviet constitution to
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be a candidate and that could cause you problems. if that had been successful you would not have a senator rubio or a senator cruz both of whom who started as underdogs. >> you got a story about mark sanford who is in the runoff. his opponent, mark did incredibly well the other night and he'll tell everybody here. i like mark. he has been a good friend of mine for a very long time and he will remain a good friend of mine for a very long time. but he's in a runoff. he did great. he is probably going to win. i like this. his opponent here chris and jenny bostic family of five! i think he will get the family book thrown at him with their five children. mike? >> that's right. we talked yesterday to the house
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democratic campaign chairman steve israel and clear from his body language they and former governor sanford to become congressman sanford which is quite remarkable. >> it really is. i stopped one short. i got four children! >> i have seven! >> you could win! >> i'm going down there and run! >> i know nothing about like who is the next mayor in here. i'm thinking the "new york post" doesn't like this lady. how would you like to wake up to this headline? look at this! >> in new york. >> i've seen worse. >> not only is it new york, it is the "new york post." i'm just guessing they probably will not endorse her. >> mike allen, thank you. >> mike, thank you. >> have in all caps great day! >> we will. and we have the soviet constitution. up next contributing editor for new york magazine and founder of web side deadspin,
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will leitch will take us inside the science of baseball. >> will you introduce him correctly? like barbara boxer, i worked hard for the title senator! >> sorry. >> he is the great. >> the great will leitch. >> the great willie! >> he joins us next with his new article. we're here! we're going to the park! [ gina ] oh hey, dan! i really like your new jetta! and you want to buy one like mine because it's so safe, right? yeah... yeah... i know what you've heard -- iihs top safety pick for $159 a month -- but, i wish it was more dangerous, like a monster truck or dune buggy! you can't have the same car as me! [ male announcer ] now everyone's going to want one. let's get a jetta. [ male announcer ] volkswagen springtoberfest is here and there's no better time to get a jetta. that's the power of german engineering. right now lease one of four volkswagen models for under $200 a month. visit vwdealer.com today.
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here with us now is contributing editor of "the new york" magazine the great will leitch. >> during the break, he said i didn't go to the great school of college for ten years. ik not be called the great. >> in the new issue, will writes about baseball, pitching injuries and his piece reads in part this. ever since money ball and baseball has just about everything figured out, the game is never been more closely studied or better understood and yet people have no clue how to keep pitchers from getting hurt. their health is a vital part of the game but arguably never more than it is today. a team with great pitching is, in essence, a great team. pitchers themselves never stood to gain or lose as much as they
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do right now. the average baseball salary had reached $1 million for the first time and now the average salary is 3.2 million. stay healthy and you're crazy rich. blow out your elbow and it's back to hoping your high school team needs a coach. >> this is what i don't understand, will. 50 years ago, pitchers would like go 17 innings and throw a one-hitter and they pitched longer. a lot of them pitched longer. now, they have got the pitch count on there. you get to a certain level, they pull them out. it seems like pitching less is not doing more for these guys. >> a couple of differences. on one hand, we understand injuries a little bit better now than then. i think pitchers probably were suffering injuries. >> pitch through it! >> exactly. rub some dirt on it and walk it o off. it's also part of the culture of baseball in the country in that now just the way the kids are
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raised, it's much more segmented. kids around that time their arms were conditioned to be tougher earlier because they just threw all the time and played baseball all the time. now everything is an organized activity. you play baseball for -- with your team, they schedule you to practice three times a week and you have a game on saturday. we have a much more organized way we raise kids. it's making it to -- >> it's making them weak. turn them into wimps. >> it's making them more specialized, go with that. >> they play video games all day instead of carrying bales of hay on the farm! what is your take on this? >> he eluded to it in part. i once had, a couple of years ago, one of the older, more respected managers in the game ask me a question when we were talking about pitching and pitching injuries and elbows, the ulnar nerve and rotator cuff. he asked me, have you ever known a catcher with a sore arm? they throw all the time. he said they have got these guys so specialized now, that they,
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you know, they will throw ten pitches on the day after they have a start, then a bull pen later. it's just so segmented that is part of the problem. >> one of the people i talk about the story steven strasburg of the nationals was famously shut down in a playoff chase that probably cost them against my cardinals, so i didn't mind. so much of pitch counts and limiting innings is guesswork. it's so imprecise. so much of the study of baseball is this scientific and all of this trying to figure out this stuff. when it comes to pitch counts they are really just guessing. the notion, i talked to glenn from the american sports medical institute. he said they did the best they can with strasburg but we don't know if he is more or less likely to get injured because they shut him down. everybody is just guessing. >> did one of your sons have tommy john surgery? >> tim had rotator cuff injury.
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i bumped into jack morris, the great pitcher for the toronto blue jays a couple of weeks ago at an mlb event. that spectacular game, ten innings. i was thinking about that. ron marichal versus warren spahn in 1962. 16 innings. >> what month was that? >> july 1962. they both went the distance. spahn versus marichal. that would never, ever happen today. >> you can argue maybe it shouldn't. that is the idea. on one hand it's easy to say people were tougher back in the day but they were like different in a lot of ways. they haven't figured out in a lot of ways like a lot of these kids are not conditioned to throw that much. also the players were making less money back then. in a lot of ways you had less investment in these guys. if you signed a guy like steven strasburg you have to make sure
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he is healthy and able to pitch. >> to me maybe a reason they did the wrong thing -- the one thing you do know they did not win the playoff series last year. >> in the office you can't talk to will because he is too powerful. this is like one of my rare opportunities to talk to him. >> so speak! >> like my one audience would roll for this season. quickly. tommy john surgery, is it true players are coming back stronger and throwing harder after tommy john surgery? >> a lot of that is mental. glenn says a lot of players feel that way. of course, a lot of pitchers talk how they feel they can throw 100% a month after the surgery but not allowed to do that. but like a lot of it is mental. but the lead of my story a pitcher for the yankees was ready to get tommy john surgery over with so he could get back to pitching. he knew it was going to happen at one point of his career.
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>> quick in basketball. who is in your bracket? >> i'm ashamed to say i have picked duke. i know. >> you don't want to talk to him now? >> brooklyn nets, any chance to get out of the first round of the playoffs? >> i think get out of the first round. if they can get up to the 5 spot. >> what is wrong with the knicks? >> they are old. >> let's not talk crazy. >> older than barnicle! >> what is this constant attack on me? >> just happy to see you. >> carmelo? >> he is great but he is carrying too much of the weight right now. so many injured players on the team. he is coming back perhaps a little earlier than he should be. >> he's just not the star that is going to take any team -- >> he is not lebron but very few people are. >> we have to go. >> good point. >> because we have some -- >> mika is on twitter. >> can i read this one? >> go ahead. >> joe is in a testy mood today. could be a snappy fingers day! >> it's a long story! >> i'm staying out of it. staying out of it.
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he seems snappish. >> i am seeming a bit snappy today? do you have some more? >> no. there is nothing more here to see! thank you very much, will. >> "new york" magazine. >> i love will's article "the glass arm" in the new issue of the "new york" magazine. new hope for a lasting cure in cancer research. we are here with the new issue of "time" when we come back. ♪ hey
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>> do you think this is a snappy finger today? >> i actually think that will never happen again. >> i think that's a safe bet. >> i think you're okay. okay, you two. we have time for maybe one must read. >> that is a mistake. >> you're lucky i'm having a bad allergic reaction. i can't move my face or yell at you or give you a bad face. >> what are you allergic to? >> i'm not taking them any more. i can't. >> maybe you need some processed sugar. >> fresh orange juice. >> i don't have allergies and he eat a lot of sugar. do you think it's the soft drinks? >> i don't think no one really cares. >> coke adds life. >> for a munchkin what you're sitting next to. >> i'm good. must read opinion pages. >> i ate before i came here. by the way, no allergies. >> do you know if you go to china, mcdonald's will serve you now a big mac has that has two patties and two sausages in it.
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so they can't spread the obesity crisis here they will take it abroad. >> oh, man! >> yes! >> yes! >> baby, look at that! how do you say sweet jesus? holy cow! and some fries! >> this is the food that made america great and they think if they do this, china will become a great nation. >> really? >> coke peeking out in the background is the key. you can't have that without nice sugar! >> seriously, can you imagine that? >> we can do the show remote from tiananmen square. >> you have telling their workers to have their weight checked or body mass index checked or they have to pay more on their insurance. >> can we see that again? >> oh, man! that beats the great wall! >> great wall of food! >> it is a great wall. >> can you imagine how you would
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feel after you ate that? >> marathon! >> great walls of fire! >> that looks so good. what is that on top? is that mustard or special sauce? two all beef patties, special sauce, pickles, onion. >> louis is in hong kong. >> i'll try to read this from the atlantic. >> i'm going to tell louis. >> please don't. >> give him a break. >> this is about king abdullah and it's in the atlantic by james bennett. >> jeffrey goldberg. >> so sorry. james bennett is coming on later. sorry. messed up. this is a fascinating article. give us the background. king abdullah is emotionally and dispositionally the most pro american ruler in the arab rule. his family watching "modern
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family" together. in my experience he is happiest when talking about his years in massachusetts. at deerfield academy. his core instincts may the be egalitarian but he did seem to learn something in deerfield where deference to royalty was generally lacking. everybody called him ab and he would bust dining hall tables like every other student. >> this is a remarkable, from all accounts, just a remarkable interview of king abdullah. >> it is probably the most indiscrete interview i've ever read a head of state give. he trashes his family. >> what? >> he trashes the elders he is meeting with in jordan. he trashes the heads of neighboring countries. he says he is not even sure he wants to be king any more. it is hard to understand the motive for this interview.
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normally, before any politician gives you an interview, he has a purpose. it was not clear what it was. >> explain quickly, if you will. king abdullah was not expecting to be king. >> right. >> never expecting to be king. his father made that decision at the end. >> literally on his death bed. >> everybody who knows him says he is a wonderful man. >> nice guy and very westernized but he comes through in the article almost as if he doesn't want to be where he is. i don't know any other way to put it. the stakes here are enormous. as many people think the instability in the middle east is going to go there next. that is a nightmare for the united states and even bigger nightmare for israel. >> wow. >> john heilemann, you've heard just nothing but -- an extraordinary article and interview. >> first of all, the interview made news itself. "the new york times" wrote a story about arrival journalist
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publication story which tells you it's pretty important. he is kind of amazing. he seemed -- there was onion-like quality to it and got to the point yesterday the royal court came out and tried to deny that he had said these things and jeff goldberg said that would be fine and happy to have them post the audio from the interview so people could see whether it was untrue. the royal court backed down quickly at that moment. it's one of these things in the world that richard travels in, the foreign policy hands writer establishment there was a great uproar when this came out and i think most people had never seen anything quite like it from a leader in the middle east. >> fair statement. coming up on "morning joe," the rise of the retrowife. why a new group of modern feminists saying having it all really means staying at home? we will discuss this with campbell brown, cosmo's joanna coles and the bbckatty kay.
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welcome back to "morning joe." coming up next, "the washington post" ezra klein. "time" magazine rana foroohar
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your name in light above it ♪ >> i want to express a special thanks to sarah, as well as your two sons, for their warmth and hospitality. it was wonderful to see them. they are -- i did inform the prime minister that they are very good-looking young man who clearly got their looks from their mother. >> well, i can say the same of your daughters! >> this is true. >> that's cute. welcome back to "morning joe." >> he catches on. >> john heilemann and richard haass are still with us. >> we are talking about louis! >> i know. louis is in hong kong.
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>> that's great. he could get one of those disgusting burgers. >> why do you think i'm talking about louis being in hong kong? >> you could freeze dry those things and send it over here by fedex. >> we do that with field peas from the south. >> as long as those things are being made, i don't think any company can claim to be responsible about the food they are serving, so that's just all this garbage. >> heaven right there. >> look at that. >> goes out the window when you actually present it. joining us of the "the washington post" is nbc policy analyst, ezra klein. >> you are smiling. >> you guys should keep these things in the green room. >> exactly! >> and washington anchor for bbc world news, katty kay and here for "time" magazine, rana foroohar to reveal the new issue
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and get to the important cover in a moment. first, a lot of news to cover this morning. president obama touched down in the west bank city of ramallah this morning. he was greeted by president abbas of the palestinian authority, kicking off the second leg of his four-day visit to the middle east. today, the israel army confirmed four rockets were fired from the gaza strip landing in southern israel and causing some damage. yesterday, the president met with israeli president benjamin netanyahu where the two focused on iran's nuclear ambitions and claims that the syrian government used chemical weapons in the country's civil war. >> we agree that a nuclear armed iran would be a threat to the region a threat to the world and potentially an existential threat to israel. all options are on the table. we will do what is necessary to prevent iran from getting the world's worst weapons. >> we have to make sure that we know exactly what happened, what was the nature of the incident,
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what can we document, what can we prove. so i've instructed my teams to work closely with all other countries in the region and international organizations and institutions to find out precisely whether or not this red line was crossed. once we establish the facts, i have made clear that the use of chemical weapons is a game-changer. >> that last sound bite you heard from the president was about syria and the possibility that chemical weapons are involved and he called it a game-changer, richard haass. what does that mean? >> the real question and could mean the united states would fonel start providing arms to the elements of syrian opposition. one definition. syria has hundred dollars if not thousands of chemical munitions either on planes or on missiles. if they were to start to use chemicals the question is what does the outside world do? to start taking them out is called war.
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this is not a sgr-- i think we would arm the opposition. would that be the issue that we get the russians to think twice about essentially their unconditional support of the syrians and might it provide a diplomatic opening the russians would be scared if they continue to support syria that would alienate much of the sunni/arab world. that could break the log jam otherwise it could go on and on and on. >> katty, what will it it take to pull together collective action in syria? >> i think take an awful lot. 70,000 people have died. the situation on the ground militarily is moving, much, much faster than the diplomatic situation. pressure put on back channels in moscow to get russia and vladimir putin to realize that assad is not around forever and at some point it's time to jump
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ship and support who is there in the future. my understanding is that doesn't seem to have pushed the russians at all. the russians are still firmly backing assad and don't think this is the time to switch. the alternatives in terms of arming the rebels is really all that the west is now looking at but they still have these reservations that if you give arms to elements of the rebels, how do you know that they don't end up in the hands of the extremis extremists? if america is going to dictate what happens in the future in syria, it needs to have a place at the table. it needs to be able to be part of the discussion and i suspect that will eventually lead to america taking part with a coalition in giving small arms to syrian rebels. >> ron, it's fascinating, that the president goes to israel without a peace plan in his back pocket or without any hopes of a peace plan in his back pocket. almost unprecedented. does this tell us how important iran is now, not only to the
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united states, but also, of course, to a much more closely to israel? >> i think it's always been the largest issue in the middle east, what is going to happen to iran the last few years. i think we knew we would end newspaper the back of our minds where we are now. it's unfortunate. i wonder, though, how much appetite the public has for intervention. i always thought -- yeah, very little, right? >> you say very little. i saw a pugh poll that was shocking a couple of days ago. let's look at the pugh poll talking about attacking iran. >> do we have it? we will look for it. any way, rana, i agree with you. if we had not been at war ten years, we already would have been in syria. >> exactly. >> americans are exhausted. iran might be slightly different because of our history with iran. >> i think so. you're nodding too and i bet we are going to say the same thing. >> you say first. >> well, i think for starters iran is a very different country than syria.
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if we get involved in iran, i mean, that is, i think, would be a mess of catastrophic proportions to be honest. i think iran is a country that it has a huge middle class. it is incredibly nationalistic. i think it's very, very dangerous. and i think that sanctions have been working perhaps more than we give them credit for working, richard. i don't know if you would agree with me on this. >> working to the extent they are affecting the economy but we don't know whether they will affect the decisions about the nuclear program. at least initially using military force in iran is different than in syria because have you a discrete set of targets. the reason president said it's a game-changer on syria we can't use any chemical weapons or weapons of mass destruction to go unchalelenged. the real challenge in syria is not july the human one.
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it's the presidential one. it's a tough set of decisions if we get to the point what do you do about it? what is the -- how do we implement this idea is unacceptable? >> ezra, i went on the advice the kids call the google. i googled the pugh poll. 64% of americans say military intervention, if it's necessary, to thwart nuclear ambitions of iran, then we need to use military intervention. 25% say avoid military conflict with iran. fascinating, fascinating numbers and i wonder if for a lot of people that are answering that are like me, you go back to 1979 and we are hard-wired in a way that, again, works past the ten years of war that we have been in. i'm shocked by these numbers. >> i'm surprised to hear them too. you always wonder with a poll like that to some degree, any of
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these polls, what you are reading there. a generallized feeling the u.s. can and should do big things but war with iran is an incredibly, incredibly dangerous volatile pursuit and it's much, much more catastrophic than the war with iraq and much more catastrophic than the war in afghanistan. at the time when the the military is tired and our national treasury is deeply depleted i think people answering that poll do not know the potential casualties we are signing up for there and not the ba backlash. >> and they don't know about the pain and suffering that our veterans from the last two wars are enduring because of the extraordinary backlog that paul talked about the other day. at the v.a. we can't take care of our american heroes from a decade ago of a war that
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started. we will start another war? >> i think one thought that comes in, we will do a contained thing. we go in with bombers and we will drop bombs on a couple of different military installations and that will be that. i was talking with kenneth poli poli pollack. he doesn't think you can do that kind of air strike and not led it lead into a broad war. when you open that door you don't know where it leads. some say it can be low cost i think back to the beginning of the iraq war where we told reinstruction would than $1.8 billion. american taxpayer pay $1.8 billion to rebuild iraq. it's like 800 billion dollar war so far. >> then you add on top of that the hundreds of billions that this war is going to cost us taking care of the veterans when we finally take care of the veterans the way they need to be taken care of. >> i believe it's a case that last year when there was discussion about whether there
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might be military intervention in iran, i think the defense department or the cia or possibly both about a bunch of war games scenario that got some publicity last year. they were nightmare in terms of what they would do to the region and the cost. the military does not want this gati engagement. i think polls like this are almost entirely useless, right? they are really asking people. they ask them -- they are asking people to say something about a principle. basically asking do you not want iran to have nuclear weapons? they don't talk about the scenarios what the cost would be and without the poll means almost nothing. >> we want to get to the cover of "time." pope francis carving out his own leadership style, new details about where he may stand on some
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significant issues. in an interview last year, the then archbishop floated the possibility of an eventual change to the church's rule on celibacy on priests. he also spoke very personally about this about his own struggles after being, quote, dazzled by a woman he met at a wedding during his training to become a priest. however, francis says for now the discipline of celibacy stands firm. he criticized church leaders who covered up the rehabilitation of children. he said it is a stupid idea adding you cannot be in a position of power and destroy the life of another person. i find this fascinating. >> also, mika, there was another story about how -- i think he floated the idea of the church supporting civil unions. >> yeah. >> as an attempt to find a pragmatic center between
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same-sex marriage and -- >> not that it's going to happen any time soon or ever in the catholic church. he is a human being. he is a man. with natural instincts and he doesn't separate himself from the rest of the world. this interview, to me, is so hopeful. >> katty, a couple of more years of this and you people are going to be sorry you broke away from the church. >> well, i can tell you that all of the british catholics are watching very intently what is happening in rome and they are as amazed as everybody else. this is a pope who is prepared to say that he, himself, has felt human urges towards another person. this is extraordinary to have a pope stand up and say i was dazzled by a woman. i don't think we have ever heard a pope be this personal and this personal about some of the strictures and the discipline that the church impose on people leading to the question could we
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solve some of the church's problems it's had over the child sex abuse scandal if we allow these instincts played out in another way. american catholics are clearly watching this very closely. >> it's an incredible story. we will look into it more. >> ho do you avoid to get cancer, rana? i don't want to have cancer. >> don't eat one of those chinese sausage sandwiches. >> you'll die of diabetes first. that's all. >> you got to read the story. it's an incredibly well reported story by my colleague bill sapp who was himself a cancer survivor. what is interesting about this piece it talks about how the medical complex, the medical industry is taking a tip from the movie industry about how to cure cancer. if you can you believe it, researchers around cancer
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usually work in a vidoid. one guy sitting here and given a tiny grant of 500,000 and goes off a decade and works by himself. a group of people from the movie business. sherri lansing who used to be the former chairman of mayor a mount and katie couric and laura griffin said let's take the most talented people we can find across all different platforms and put them together and give them a deadline and give them a lot of resources and see what they can do. it's amazing. the time of clinical trials is knocked down by years. folks are getting together that have been studying, say, breast cancer and ovarian cancer saying we are looking at the same gene here and let's pulling ining th together. >> prostate cancer 238,000 and
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breast cancer 234,000 and lung 228,000. colon, 102,000. you say the two leading causes of cancer, both really you could pull the resources and work together. >> absolutely. and there has been so much development in gemomic medicine and computing power you need to do all of the sequencing. the original sequencing of the human genome took billions of dollars in a decade to do it and you can do it in hours for thousands of dollars. amazing. >> unfortunately, i'm forced to speak my mind, ezra, on this. somebody on twitter actually said something intelligent a couple of weeks ago saying i think joe scarborough is being obtuse on when mika starts talking about food. you look at cancer. as well as diabetes. you look at the main driver of our long-term debt and whether you're talking about cancer, diabetes, whether you're talking
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about heart ailments or stroke. so much of it goes back to lifestyle choices. >> fair amount does. i should say i was just running through these numbers for a piece the other day. in the next 20 years louvre our health care costs from people who are aging. if you talk to population researchers and how to keep people healthy they will tell you what decides whether or not you are healthy, a very small fraction of that are the things that happen when you go into the doctor's office. much more of that is about your job, it's about the way you live. it's about what you eat. it's about your genes. it's about all of these different things. one thing we have done a very poor job of in this country, to some degree, across medicine all over the industrialized world, is figuring out how to work on the things that keep people healthy as opposed to to things have made them sick. it's a very tough thing because it spans a lot of different
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disciplines and a lot of different parts of people's lives and we don't know exactly how to get into that. it is, if we want to keep people healthy and improve their quality of life, there are much bigger gains to be made in terms of keeping these things from going wrong in the first place than in terms of event treating them once they have gone wrong. >> there is progress there. stop smoking. the rest. they have in common the noncommunicable diseases. these are the epidemic. >> we are learning sitting too long in fronts of computers is unhealthy. >> or sitting in front of the tv. >> you want to start your day by watching tv for three hours. >> right. >> so we find out yesterday that crazy dear friend of ours. we were talking to him on the phone yesterday. he has a treadmill. he has has treadmill and i run
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morning for three hours and i walk four hours. >> he was very serious. >> he was very serious. ari tells me you got to take an aspirin and it will stop prostate cancer. then his brother, zeke, the real doctor, said he is an idiot. the wrong type of cancer. we are learning certain things, though, about lifestyle. so much based on lifestyle. >> this is why mika loves the mayor because the mayor is trying to address the things that ezra is talking about or what drove the mayor to help with the sugar consumption and soda in the city and he becomes the object of scorn and ridicule from people like you. >> maybe i need to be so obtuse. >> you are so obtuse p.m. the bottom line is the loss of the mayor in the last round was a loss for society. but he'll be back. >> yeah, he has got $24 billion. i think he wins again. the new issue is how to cure
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cancer. rana, will rejoin in a minute. ezra, glood to see you. up ahead on "morning joe" a question for all parents. how much time is too much time for kids to be on the ipad? up next, the return of the stay at home mom. why a new breed of feminists are saying to sheryl sandberg's lean in message, no thanks, we choose to lean out. we will discuss with new york magazine and others coming up on "morning joe." >> and, of course, i'll weigh in with my opinion. right? ♪ i don't want any trouble. i don't want any trouble either. ♪ [ engine turns over ]
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♪ my heartfelt message to all of and start thinking about this now. do not leave before you leave. don't lean back. lean in.
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put your foot on that gas pedal and keep it there until the day you have to make a decision, and then make a decision. that's the only way. when that day comes, you'll even have a decision to make. >> that was facebook chief operating officer sheryl sandberg allowing the harvard students to lean in. a growing number of women are choosing instead to lean out an article "the retrowife" lisa interviewed a stay at home wife. kelly calls hearses a flaming liberal and a feminist too. i want my daughter to be able to do anything she wants but i also want to say have a career that you can walk away from at the drop of a hat. she is not alone. far from the bible belt's conservative territories in blue state cities and suburbs young
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educated married mothers find themselves not uninterested in the conversation about having it all, but untouched by it. they are too busy minding their grandmother's old fashioned lives for values. like heirlooms and wear proudly as their own. joining the table is former news anchor campbell brown and editor and chief of "cosmopolitan" magazine and joanne coles is with us and also is katty kay. when you looked as thee numbers and sort of trend that you track here, what is behind it? is it a choice or reality? >> i think this is an economy story. these are not very affluent women who are educated in the ivy league who are fleeing their law firm jobs. these are women whose families are earn much less and in a world where our financial futures are uncertain and we don't know what is going to become of us and you're not making that much money and
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you've got two little kids and your husband is working all the time, it makes sense to lean out and focus on the home sphere. >> is that what you're finding the women that you interviewed, the one that you interviewed and the women you talked to, is that a negative reality? >> no. what is wonderful about what is happening is the women are embracing this. it's not the survivaling boredom that betty ferdinand described years ago. it's embracing motherhood and the home and doesn't mean everything has to be perfect. they are emphatic about that. it's not like martha stewart, perfect, perfect. it's about, you know, making sure you're teaching your kids the right values. it's about cooking healthy meals. it's about reading to your kids. it's about taking them to museums. >> it's sort of the choice to be there, campbell? >> but i read your piece in the
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context of the whole sheryl sandberg lean in situation and i think it's a stark choice and i think for most people it's more in the middle. you lean in in certain moments and lean out. men have a career tra jaeckjectd spend most of their lives climbing to the top. women, you have kids and whether it's by choice or exhaustion you step away. i don't think men -- i know sheryl says, okay, get your husband to do half the house work and make it easier. >> not realistic. >> one example. >> poor dan. >> what are you about to stay? >> literally i'm moderating one of the presidential primary debates after having a baby. sitting in a dirty closet on the floor behind the auditorium where this debate is taking place between obama, hillary clinton, and i'm pumping breast
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milk. i just had my kid 20 minutes before i'm going on. i'm trying to get my head in the game. think about the questions i wanted to ask. breast milk is flying everywhere over my notes. how do you lean in at that moment? what is the equivalent of that for wolf blitzer or joe scarborough? it is a moment where you say, i can't do this! and i don't care what advice is in a self-help book that sort of gets me over that hump! >> you were doing it, though. >> you've had moments like that? >> no, i haven't. it is so much easier for men because looking at my mom or my aunts or other women in my life that have worked and been juggling everything, it's just so hard, because, you know, you go all in one way and you feel like you're missing out. you go in all in the other warks you feel like you're missing out. it's a constant balancing act and most women i know --
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>> as campbell says, life is messy. but i think the point of sheryl's book is asking the question why aren't there more senior women in business, in politics? there is a shortage of senior women everywhere. what she is trying to do is start a conversation to ask questions, which are awkward. she says is this something innate in women that makes them feel anxious about the fact they can't do everything? i mean, you might have said, well, you know what? campbell, can you do the next presidential debate? maybe you shouldn't be trying to do the breast pump and the presidential debate and it is too much or maybe you could have said, i'm not going to pump for this baby. i'm not going to breast feed this baby. there are choices you have to make. you didn't want to make the choice. you wanted to do it all at that moment. >> lots of luck telling the president of nbc news, you know what? i can't do this presidential debate because i'm going to be pumping my breast milk. >> i bet if the president of nbc was a woman, you would have been
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able to say -- >> she is now but she wasn't then, i think. >> you could have said, actually, i would love to be able to do it next time around. can you hold me a slot? at least you can have the conversation. >> i think it's totally unrealistic but go ahead. >> i think kelly is very honest with hearses about what it is she wants. i think it's very hard for women who are looking at sheryl sandberg and saying, i should be like that. i should be like hillary clinton. i should be like joanna coles and like campbell brown. >> god forbid, they won't be like me. if they only seen me this morning. chaotic. just saying. >> we all have kids at home that are being taken care of by somebody else right now. but i think that if you're more honest with yourself about what it is that you really want, then women who really want to work hard and strive and kick it at work should be able to do that. and women who want to lean out and make a beautiful birthday
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cake and have that be a feminist move should be able to do that. >> you just said we all have somebody at home taking care of our kids right now. isn't it a lot easier when you're sheryl sandberg or most of the people at this table who can afford a nanny who is sitting there reading to your children versus a mother who maybe has to leave their kid with a relativelve relative who them in front of the tv. >> and none of you say i don't want a nanny reading to my child. reminds me of the "the new york times" article on the front of sunday review or weekend review or whatever, if they changed the name of it on me. just simplifying things. the guy had all of this money in the tech world and decided to strip everything down and simplify it and sounds like a lot of women are making this decision you know what? we don't need to double the salary. i want to stay home and read to my kids. >> which is all fantastic and
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feminist is about able to exercise choice. the key thing that women understand when they make those choices, they impact their long-term future. if you leave the work force, and especially if you leave the work force in a job that you don't feel is going very far, you'll never, ever going to have the option to high a nanny because you're taking yourself out of the market economically. all of the studies show, senior women who take two years out to look after their kids lose up to 18% of their salary over their career. that is a huge amount of money. and it's incredibly different because child care is not easily available. i moved here and not a family at all. my husband, thank goodness, is looking after our children right now. it's incredible and messy. but if you opt out completely your economic choices are really limited and you're dependent on a husband and he may not always be around. >> that is the key i wore about with your contention. >> you wrote about all of this a
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year ago, mika. a lot of what sheryl wrote about, you wrote about a year ago. it was fascinating. in your book, you told young women don't wait to get married. don't wait to have kids because if you do, you're going to wake up 40 and your job is going to let you down. >> if it's something you want in life. you don't -- i don't think you take getting a job more seriously than looking for a family and looking for that other point of feminine life when is another conversation. to your story and now to katty kay, i think it's interesting because we do have the book that i wrote but also the book that sheryl wrote called "lean in." you're supposed to say i need this in order to be able to be with my children for few months and then i need -- and i actually venture to believe that in some companies, you can. you just have to. i think women, as sheryl points out, are rhett sint to actually say what they need because they
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feel guilty or bad or perhaps maybe they won't be seen as productive, katty. >> we wrote this when we tried to redefine the workplace. we came to the conclusion that actually it's the systems that work that have to change and what is it that women were leaving the work force. we were losing professional journalists and we were losing lawyers and doctors because they were hitting that brick wall of kids versus career and the kids were winning because actually women were looking at the workplace and looking at the top of the workplace and saying, no thanks. since 1992, the number of women who say they want more responsibility at work has declined by 50%. we are looking at that environment and saying it just doesn't work at the very top if we also want to have children. and so what we have to do is change the structures of the work force. we have got to say to our companies -- and i think this is the biggest feminist revolution. if we can change the shape of that border and table to make it more family friendly and implement more flexible work
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programs and have careers up and down uncan dial up and dial back again at certain stages. actually those companies find the productivity increases. the companies that say to women and to men we don't care about your input. we care about your output. where and when you work for doesn't matter but what you do produce matters. that works so well for women. in those circumstances, productivity rises for the company and you keep women in the work force. >> i venture to say we might be more productive when we have small children because we're on fire and trying to keep it all going and we are not checked out. every argument made here at the table is valid and i think the bigger point here, whether it's the contention of your article, your description of the situation that you were in covering the conventions. you i powered through after my second kid and had a horrible accident and never do it again. there is certainly an argument to be made by leaning back.
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or saying what you need. and i think that i love this conversation. i want to have more. i just want to get closing thoughts from everybody. i start with lisa. >> we need a revolution in the workplace and women's natures but none of that accounts for how difficult life is on the ground. and the fact that when men have kids, they go to work more. and when women have kids -- >> yes, we do! honey, i'm sorry, i have to go on a business trip for three months. >> and feel terribly guilty and wears on them. >> i think what the story tries to do is tease apart what is real instead of the manifest tows by these women. >> and judgments. >> and who are accomplished and making a ton of dough. >> it's interesting. katty wrote her book several years ago and you wrote your book a year ago. the conversation is stagnant. nothing has changed that much. flex time is not this new idea. it's been around for years. but not that many companies have actually implemented it.
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once they have, it's still a stigma to take advantage of it. you do feel like you're being penalized. to sheryl's credit, the book is forcing yet another conversation about why over this many years has nothing changed? >> isn't it, joanna, up to us to sort of -- >> it's definitely up to us. we have to change the language. i'm sure sno one has ever referred to joe as a working father and we have all been referred to as working mothers. but here is the crazy thing. the empirical research shows businesses do better when they have diverse senior work forces across race and across the genders. you do better if you have women in your business. look at politics and gridlock. look at the financial system. total chaos. look at the catholic church. good lord, you need women in there. >> we talked about nbc news also. i'll just say it. when i first came here, you know, i had been a lawyer, a football coach, i had been been in congress.
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i was shocked by how male -- was. it was straight out of the 1950s. i was shocked. we have a woman now running nbc news. that is how the culture changes. >> we know how the salaries work here and i'm serious. fantastic conversation. >> you've educated an entire generation of women on how to negotiate. >> katty -- thank you. final thoughts? >> i would say take that information that companies need women, that we are good for the bottom line. that we are profitable. put it in your back pocket and remind yourself every day you're not there by the grace and favor of your employer, you're there because you're valuable. if you need more time off, if you need a more flexible work arrangement or higher salary, ask for it. >> the cover story in "new york "magazine, the retrowife. thank you all for joining us. coming up the three-year
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anniversary of the passage of obama care is what some call it. >> i made a birthday cake for that. >> is it hurting or helping the cause. we will ask the human and health services secretary kathleen sebelius in a minute. [ kitt ] you know what's impressive? a talking car. but i'll tell you what impresses me. a talking train. this ge locomotive can tell you exactly where it is, what it's carrying, while using less fuel.
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♪ only you know and i know ♪ >> tomorrow we will talk to the rnc chairman reince priebus. coming up next is kathleen sebelius talking to us about the three-year anniversary of obama care. conservative. very logical thinker. (laughs) i'm telling you right now, the girl back at home would absolutely not have taken a zip line in the jungle. (screams)
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♪ back against the wall ♪ ain't nothin to me ♪ ain't nothin to me [ crowd murmurs ] hey! ♪ [ howls ] ♪ ♪ it was three years ago today that president obama signed the affordable health care into law. joining us is kathleen sebelius. >> thank you, mika. >> three years later, tell us some of the benefits that are in place that you think perhaps people don't still yet understand? because one of the biggest criticisms this had as you all
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were hark through it wasn't communicated well to the american people. >> well, i think there's still some misunderstanding, but what is already in place is really beginning to help people. i was listening to your earlier conversation about people staying health caier. millions of people both in the private market and on medicare now have preventive services. colon cancer screenings and mammograms and flu shots with their kids can no copays and no coinsurance meaning they get checkups earlier and take advantage of that. parents who have children with preexisting conditions know it's illegal for a insurance company to keep their children out of the marketplace. we have parents who were uninsured before the president signed this bill into law and now have insurance coverage. we have over a hundred thousand of really the sickest people in this country who are in high-risk pools. what we are seeing costs have
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come down for the first time in a very long time. medicare costs are significantly lower than they were. cost trajectory is down. in fact, the costs last year in medicare went up less than 1% per beneficiary and that is really good news. >> so the laundry list of benefits is there. what needs to, after three years, what do you think needs to be tweaked or changed? especially with the criticism that comes from some republicans who even would like to still get rid of it all. >> well, i think, again, what we're about to see coming up at the end of this year, starting with october 1st, is open enrollment period with new market in every state in the country. and what that means, mika, is that for the first time ever, people who are uninsured, because of costs, and a lot of people who are buying coverage on their own and a lot of small business owners, will finally be part of insurance with plans that have to compete
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side-by-side, they will be able to see what the benefits, they will be able to compare them. and be part of a big pool and take advantage of the kind of costs leverage that big companies have already had. we have a great website healthca health.gov. >> the phrase let's see what le, despite all the elements of progress that you've mentioned, there have been in some states, california specifically and a few other states, companies like aetna, blue cross, raising their insurance rates sometimes as high as 20%, 25%. there's a fear out there with people with private health insurance that their rates in their states, their own private plans are going to raise. why have the rates risen and will they rise even further? >> mike, i think what we're
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seeing actually again is pretty good news. i'm a former insurance commissioner so i used to watch this day in and day out. in the ten years before obama care was signed into law, what we saw is double-digit increases year in and year out. small employers dropping coverage. so fewer people had insurance in their workplace and costs continued to rise. we have seen far fewer double-digit increases in the last three years than in the previous decade and more insurance commissioners like in california are really reviewing those rates carefully. are rejecting the double-digit increases. and companies for the first time ever have to spend 80 cents out of every premium dollar on health benefits, not ceo salaries, not overhead costs. so the companies had to send a billion dollars back to customers all over the country last year because they exceeded that 80/20 rule. and that is really good news for consumers. they're finally getting a better bang for their buck. >> you know, secretary, i'm
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really interested in what you were saying about savings on preventative health care. having lived in europe for a decade, i saw what that can do for cost reduction and for the health of the population and we've had so much discussion about that around what's happened in new york with soft drinks, et cetera. what do you think -- how much farther can we go there and what would you like to see happen in terms of preventative savings and how can obama care help with that? >> well, i think two things can happen. first of all, when everybody has coverage, what you start having people do is get checkups, have a health home, manage their diseases if they have diseases and hopefully avoid getting them in the first place. so we know insurance coverage makes a big difference in terms of overall health care, preventive care and costs. we also are doing for the first time ever under the first lady's lordship some terrific work around childhood obesity. we know obesity is one of the huge drivers of health costs. we're doing some very good work around smoking, trying to drive
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down the number of smokers and try to make sure that kids don't start in the first place. again, a big driver of health costs. and that's all part of this overall plan. so the focus on prevention is incredibly important, and making sure that people get out ahead of their disease and don't come through the doors of an emergency room with no coverage when they're in a very acute situation. we're seeing a lot of changes in the underlying health care costs. i know joe talks a lot about entitlement plans and we know that medicare and medicaid are actually big programs. but in the last three years, those costs are significantly lower than they have ever been in the 50-year history. and what we're trying to do is get the private sector to follow that lead. >> all right. secretary kathleen sebelius, thank you very much for being on the show this morning and for your work for this country. >> you know, she talked about obesity being a driver of health
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care costs. secretary sebelius, i try to tell mika that every morning. she doesn't listen to me. >> thanks very much. come back on the show. it's didn't to see you. >> healthcare.gov. check out the site. coming up, one of the founding members of the band fish makes the jump to broadway. we'll ask him about his brand new musical opening today. sounds cool. you're watching "morning joe" approved by starbucks. mom always got good nutrition to taste great.
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take a close look at this church. does it kind of look like a chicken -- >> next the pentagon considers a major makeover for gitmo, including a $10 million complex for detainees to meet with their lawyers. so what does it mean for president obama's promise to shut it all down? that's next on "morning joe." many cereals say they're good for your heart, but did you know there's a cereal that's recommended by doctors? it's post shredded wheat. recommended by nine out of ten doctors to help reduce the risk of heart disease.
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what went wrong, why are we further away from a two-state solution? i am curious. what do you believe went wrong? did you push israel too hard? mr. prime minister, i want to help out my colleague over here. do you accept the president's understanding that iran is a year away when it comes to nuclear weapons? another question i had for you is why do you -- >> chuck, how many you got? do you guys do this in the israeli press? you say you get one question and you get five? >> i'm helping him. >> you see how the young lady from channel one, she had one question? >> i thought i had four questions. passover starts in a couple days. i get four questions, right? >> look, this is not a kosher question, but don't hog it. good morning. it's 8:00 on the east coast, 5:00 a.m. on the west coast. you have got to wake up. >> no, you really should stay in
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bed. >> nope. >> it's cold. >> at this point you can get ahead of the game or go back to sleep and then be scrambling all day. back with us on seat we have mike barnacle, john heilman and richard huss. we have some fascinating stories. >> how about chuck todd asking 87 questions. i liked it. that was a great line about passover, and passover you get four questions. >> i like it. you get your chance, take it. >> okay. we'll start there actually. president obama touched down in the west bank city of ramallah this morning. he was greeted by president abbas kicking off the second leg of his visit to the middle east. today the israeli army confirmed four rockets were fired from the gaza strip landing in southern israel and causing some damage. the rocket strike, which has not been claimed by any palestinian militant groups is the second violation of the cease-fire that ended the clash between the
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hamas and israel this past november. yesterday the president's meeting with israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu focused on another threat to israel in the region, iran's nuclear ambitions. >> woe agree that a nuclear armed iran would be a threat to the region, a threat to the world and potentially an kp thr to israel. >> so richard, help somebody out at home that's watching this. the president of the united states goes over there and hamas or allies decide at this point to fire missiles into israel, which they do all the time. but can you explain why they would act and continue to act in a way that is against their best interests? >> well, for groups like hamas, their title represents what they are. they're the islamic resistance movement. this is station identification. this is the way that they essentially say we have a better
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path for dealing with the israelis. >> no peace. no peace. >> not a negotiated peace, certainly not a peace on the terms being discussed by israel or the united states. >> not a peace that recognizes israel's right to exist. >> supposedly there are some debates within it. you've got a devoided palestinian world. that's one of the reasons, by the way, that the president is not putting the issue at the center of things. everyone is preoccupied in the arab world. you've got a new israeli government that was elected not to make peace, not to make war but simply to deal with the role of the orthodox in israeli society. this is the most unripe situation for diplomacy any american president has walked into. >> and this american president i think has bent over backwards to try to be an honest broker between the israelis and palestinians and he did so in a way that actually angered the israelis. so hamas launches rockets into
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israel while the president is there, and what do they do? they actually push away a guy that, again, has tried to be an honest broker. >> yeah, he has tried to be an honest broker and he has paid a price for it in domestic politics. what do you think of the theory, more than a theory i would guess, that this trip is based less on policy than it is on the president's personality, convincing the israelis and the israeli government that i am your friend, the united states is your friend. we're not going to falter or hesitate or anything when it comes to the defense of israel. >> i don't think he's aiming so much at the israeli government, he's aiming at the israeli public. he's looking over the head of the government, which is quite weak. this time he shows up, he's stronger, he just won re-election. benjamin netanyahu is weaker, he had a weak showing in the election. so the president is going over
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his head and he wants to begin a dialogue with the israeli people. show the united states is a friend of israel and show that israel taking more risks for peace than netanyahu has been willing to support is a good idea. this is the beginning of a long conversation. >> with us now from jerusalem andrea mitchell. andrea, given all that we've talked about and all the constraints and all the years that this has been in the making, what is the white house hoping to accomplish in this trip? >> reporter: well, they have accomplished already what they hope to accomplish and they'll do more with the speech today reaching over the heads as you've just been pointing out to the israeli people and especially to israeli youth. but one of the blogs on the jewish post today was he had us at shalom. his first words on getting off air force one. then he takes off his jacket, so netanyahu has to take off his jacket. they walk buddy-buddy across the tarmac. he goes and looks at the iron dome which the u.s. paid for
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which is one of the successful anti-missile defenses. there's some arguments over the technology but the israelis view it as very successful in protecting itself mostly from those rockets from gaza. so there is so much symbolism here. the friendliness, the schmoozing. in fact our friend jeffrey goldberg blogged that this is really operation desert schmooze. he's here covering it as well. you could not believe the buddy system. these are the two figures, the israeli and american leaders, who have been most at loggerheads of any combination since, you know, reagan and bagan and this new relationship, this restart has really worked so far. some israeli commentators are writing that the israeli people really have to wake up to the fact that they cannot be an armed camp and they have to deal with the palestinian issue. >> all right.
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john. >> hey, andrea, it's john heilman. i'm curious, there's been so much scratchiness between netanyahu and barack obama over the course of the last four years. you now had an event in the course of the presidential campaign where netanyahu more or less endorsed mitt romney for president. how much of the love that's coming from bb towards our president is kind of him trying to make sure that he has not done long-term damage to the relationship in that direction? we know what barack obama's objectives are but it seems to me that netanyahu is trying to make up for any hurt feelings about what he did over last summer. >> reporter: absolutely. and there is a political balance here. if you can see the seesaw right now, netanyahu is weaker than a re-elected barack obama. they need each other, but israel needs the u.s. to have its back both pauf sebecause of syria, t
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possibility of chemical weapons which would be as the president said a real game-changer. though i'm told they have no evidence that chemical weapons were used by the regime. the president is very clear it would not have been used by the opposition. that was a fallacious argument from the regime. if they were used, it would be a game-changer. but israel needs the u.s. for iran and they do seem to be coming closer together on the timeline of iran. it's very clear from what the president said that he would support military action and he's not bluffing. >> richard, i can only say this thinking like a politician thinks and it doesn't matter what level you are, you're always a politician, i would be getting on the phone with barack obama and say, hey, listen, you want me to push back on iran and you want to tell me the red line is a year or 18 months from now instead of what my own people -- i tell you what, this is what's going to happen. if you don't want us to go in, i need you over here and i need you standing next to me and i
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need you assuring my people that you are on my side, that you are on israel's side. so we look forward to having you over here. i really do -- personally, again, no evidence, i really think this has so much to do with netanyahu saying, okay, you want me to really keep delaying things? >> it's actually half that. for an israeli prime minister, the single most important thing you've got to do to remain popular in israel is show that you can manage israel's most important bilateral relationship, the relationship with the united states. netanyahu mismanaged this relationship. he essentially endorsed mitt romney. so the balance of power between the two has definitely shifted in barack obama's direction. the most interesting substantive thing to happen yesterday besides the comment on syria was essentially the timelines on iran. >> if that's the case, why does barack obama -- you know, barack obama doesn't go to the capitol unless it's in his best interests. why would he go to israel unless
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he was being told he needed to come over there because of iran? >> on iran you've got netanyahu to essentially move much closer to his timeline. they pushed the issue into 2014 yesterday. that's the lead story, i think, out of yesterday. so he got the help there. barack obama banked something yesterday. he invested -- he bet bebe halfway when he didn't have to and it will help him in the long run in managing this relationship. this relationship has change ed over the last couple of months. the political fortunes of bebe went down and barack obama went up. in a funny sort of way the balance of power shifted between them. the white house is working on shifting oversight of its lethal drone program from the cia to the military, according to the "wall street journal." the move would make the controversial program subject to international law. strikes would be undertaken with the consent of host governments.
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while many in washington believe the program will be more effective under the cia, the proposal reflects a growing consensus that it needs to be on sturdier legal footing. yesterday the senate judiciary committee kicked up hearings on the use of drones domestically. senators on both sides expressed concerns over privacy. some members are mulling possible federal regulations. the faa estimates 30,000 drones could be flying in the u.s. skies in the next 20 years. richard haass is shaking his head. that's impossible to consider. >> i think the white house is caught by surprise with the bipartisan pushback. 30,000 drones? this is a brave new world we're totally unprepared for. this is the wild west, if you will, in the skies. i want to get to two more. despite promises to close down the detention center. >> he's going to do that his first year after he's inaugurated. >> it's not already closed? >> january 20th, 2010.
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he promised that during the entire campaign. >> in 2008 you mean. >> but he promised it for a year from the day i'm sworn in. >> because if you're going to keep it, you may as well make it nice. exactly. >> she needs to read the story because nobody knows what we're talking about. >> they just fight over themselves. >> guantanamo bay, the u.s. is considering $150 million overhaul of the facility. the plans include a new hospital, guard barracks and dining hall. lawyers for detainees say unrest among the inmates is growing to life-threatening levels and hunger strikes have recently tripled. >> guantanamo is the country's most expensive prison per capita with an operating budget of nearly $177 million. that's more than $1 million for each of the 166 detainees. the obama administration says it's committed to closing gitmo,
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efforts which have been repeatedly blocked by congress. >> it's not just blocked by congress. >> that's ridiculous. >> they're worried these people are going to get tortured or killed. you can't just release them. we used to teach at the ken dough school when i was a professor there the difference between policy design and policy implementation. this is a perfect example. it seemed like a good idea at the time. the more people learned about it, they realize everything you try to do would make a bad situation worse. there is a positive side. >> what is that? >> this is a good example of policy continuity. >> hold on just a second. $10 million. you don't have white house tours, but $10 million being spent for a legal meeting complex where lawyers can meet with the alleged terrorists. >> what are you for, closing it or keeping it open? >> i think that's important. >> i bet they also have the mlb
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package. coming up on "morning joe" a member of the band fish, you know fish? >> yeah. >> trey anastasio will be with us in a few minutes to discuss his new broadway musical. and up next, the touch screen generation, how new technology is altering the way our kids think. james bennett of "the atlantic" joins us next. that is amazing. they think everything is right there. >> are you knocking james bennett? >> now what? you don't like james bennett? >> we just did a long new york magazine story. >> new york, new york, magazine. >> he's good. >> all right. >> will you get him over here? >> but first, let's go -- >> we'd be honored to meet him. >> that's fine. >> let's go to bill karins for a check on the forecast. >> is it like friday morning before vacation week around here? let's talk about your thursday forecast. we have a little light snow heading for areas around i-95.
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you may see flurries just outside of the beltway up to new york city. the only area to get accumulating snow would be southern new england, especially rhode island out towards cape cod. so what is next? it's plenty cold enough. the next storm is already on the map, it came through the northwest yesterday. there's another one coming down from alaska. unfortunately, our long-range computer models, the estimated snowfall over the next week, this is primarily saturday in the rockies, sunday from colorado out into kansas, i mean there's a possibility of 6 inches of heavy wet snow and that could track all the way through the ohio valley to the mid-atlantic as we go throughout the day on monday. hopefully this one will be our last snowstorm moving across the country. i think i said that two or three times already. so the forecast today light snow showers in new england. in the northwest, light rain for seattle. we're okay in california through texas today. as far as what we're dealing with tomorrow, really nothing major. we'll be watching that storm coming down through the rockies. another winter storm,
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ridiculous, march. can't wait until april. union station, washington, d.c., it's a cold, breezy, gloomy winter-like day. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. [ female announcer ] how do you define your moment? the blissful pause just before that rich sweetness touches your lips. the delightful discovery, the mid-sweetening realization that you have the house all to yourself. well, almost. the sweet reward, making a delicious choice that's also a smart choice. splenda no-calorie sweetener. with the original sugar-like taste you love and trust. splenda makes the moment yours. it shows. we don't run like that. we build john deere equipment the way we always have: the right way. times change. our principles don't. you don't just have our word on it. you've got our name on it.
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with us now, the editor in chief of "the atlantic" james bennett. he looks at the touch screen generation. and rona is still with us too. >> there's no way i could miss the opportunity to be on tv with james bennett. >> you were attacking him viciously this morning. sal savagely. >> i can now attack him to his face so all the better.
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>> so hannah rosen writes the cover story and she says this in part. technological confidence and sophistication have not for parents translated into comfort and ease, they have merely created yet another sphere that parents feel they have to navigate in exactly the right way. on the one hand, parents want their children to swim expertly in the digital stream that will have them navigate all their lives. on the other hand they fear that too much digital media too early will sink them. parents end up treating tablets like precision surgical instruments, gadgets that might perform miracles for their children's i.q. and help them win some nifty robotics competition, but only if they are used just so. otherwise, the child could end up one of those sad, pale creatures who can't make eye contact and has an avatar for a girlfriend. >> she says it like it's a bad thing. what's the problem with that? >> i know, i know. it really is a problem. you know, i actually told my
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sons growing up, my older sons and i'm telling my younger kids too, these days read a book, own the world. what's this doing to our kids' brains? >> that's what she set out to find. hannah, in addition to being a great writer, reporter, editor is also the mother of three and she has all the same anxieties all of us have. we didn't grow up with these things. our kids are obsessed with them and what effect is it having. so she sets out on this intellectual journey to try to figure out what's going on. her big takeaway is we should all calm down about it actually. >> really? >> and while the evidence isn't yet in, this is great for kids. it's certainly not in that it's bad for them. there's emerging science and thinking at least among child psychologists and developmental specialists that it may actually be good. >> it's the world in which they live of i was worried about my two older boys playing video
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games all the time. within a decade you saw these studies that kids that played video games knew better how to do this and that with computers. >> the thing that has always scared people about tv, and there is science around this, when toddlers younger than 2 1/2 have what's called video deficit when they watch the screen passively, they can't really assemble a coherent narrative about what's happening. the way our brains develop, we need some interaction, which a tablet actually supplies because you do something and you get a response for it. it's not a substitute for a loving care giver of some sort in your life, but at least it's responding. >> i do wonder, though, about attention spans. i have two kids, 6 and 10. i'm one of these brooklyn mommies that buys hand made wooden toys from germany andy courages the kids to read books. although when i need them to be quiet, i will hand them the kindle fire. and i do notice that they're a little more -- my son is a
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little more agitated after playing games on that. is there anything there to worry about really? >> let's start by saying your son's a boy. i'd say based on my experience -- and those who grew occupy without these devices is the same. it's true, all things in moderation, although as part of her expiration of the story, hannah kind of experimented on her own kid and let her youngest play as much as he wanted on the tablet. >> what did she find? >> that he obsessed about it at first and then it just became another toy in the toy bin like all the rest of them and was forgotten under the bed for long periods of time. he would return to it and actually it helped him with his writing and to learn his letters a little bit, but he kind of let go of his obsession. >> you just never know the impact. you never know the impact. we've got a 4-year-old who has been around ipads and iphones
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from the dpbeginning. the kid can sit down for an hour and a half and put legos together and has more of an attention span than my other three children. you never know how this stuff is going to impact. is this, john, maybe this generation's version of television where we all had friends in school whose parents never let them watch television and they were very proud of it and usually they were some of the dumber people in class? >> yes, yes, i think it's true. steven johnson, a great science writer, wrote a book called "everything that's bad is good for you" which had a lot of stuff about television but also video games. there's a lot of research that shows that is this question of analytical skills, reasoning skills, the level of interaction with the games, it obviously depends what game you're talking about. so in the future there's going to be and there already is a growth industry of educational games that are based on they're educational and based on gaming -- on the skill set that
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people think are very promising. they're in fact -- in new york city there are a couple of charter schools that are built around the notion of video games but constructive video games. i think you're seeing a lot of evidence that that's being channelled in a positive direction. >> that's true. part of her argument is also that games are not a bad thing for a kid either and not everything has to be labeled educational to necessarily be good for them. just because the kid is playing with the tablet instead of playing outside, you shouldn't necessarily beat yourself up as a mother or father about that. and that there's -- there's a lot of learning that comes along with even some of the most basic video games that these kids experience. >> so you've got another piece in this magazine we've talked about a couple of times today on this show already. jeff goldberg's piece on king abdullah, got picked up by your former employer, "the new york times," as a news story. talk about what the king said that has provoked so much interest and controversy. >> thanks.
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jeff goldberg did just an incredible job reporting and writing this story, i think. he spent a lot of time with the king, went back several times. i think what you get is this very complex portrait of a monarch trying to solve an almost impossible political puzzle. he talked very candidly about his relatively low opinion of some of his neighbors, including mow maumd morhammed morsi of eg prime minister of turkey who he sees as an islamist in sheep's clothing. he worries about corruption in his own family. we're talking about families, it's also the portrait of a father who's preoccupied with the future of his own son and he's trying to transition his monarchy to a kind of constitutional monarchy and he invokes it explicitly modelled on the british. because he says kings like me, is this really a long-term growth industry, are we going to be around this 15 years? >> this guy, he trashed
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everybody in this piece. it was kind of like the thought bubbles that you always imagine folks might have but you never see it in print. was he just -- what made him so ready to talk, do you think? >> that's a goldberg technique, right? >> getting people to talk? >> getting them drunk and then getting them to talk? >> part of it i can't really say what his motives are. he's trying to reach an international audience and make them understand how cross-pressured he is. he's been under a lot of pressure from the americans. hillary clinton was putting a lot of pressure on him to reform faster than he felt ready to, felt than his kingdom was ready for him to progress. one of the ironies is he now feels the arab spring is giving him an opportunity to do the things he's always wanted to do. but part of it is a credit to -- john knows this. like experienced matters, jeff is a great reporter, he's been around the block. he's been back to the middle east again and again. >> and he knows abdullah really
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well. >> the first response, james, was, oh, my god, the king really screwed up and they were trying to take a couple of steps back. i think politically it's a pretty astute move to attack your own family for acting like a bunch of spoiled, royal brats. i think the king may get -- may have gotten what he wanted out of this interview despite the protests, i don't know. >> yeah, that's a really interesting point. he's got a very -- he's got very delicate politics he needs to negotiate. >> the "times" said he might not survive the year. do you agree? >> wow, i would not venture a guess on that. i certainly -- i think we should have some humility about predicting long-term developments in the middle east generally. i wouldn't have guessed bashar would have survived. one final prediction, john heilman, does he stay out of rehab in 2013? >> i think you have to have some humility about that too.
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>> he proves you wrong. >> since james and i actually met in rehab about 15 years ago. the story on "the atlantic" is the touch screen generation. coming up, financial crisis in cyprus is reaching a critical point as the european central bank dpifz the nation until monday to agree to new bailout terms. we're going live to cyprus next. [ male announcer ] when it comes to the financial obstacles military families face, we understand. our financial advice is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. life brings obstacles. usaa brings retirement advice.
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time for business before the bell at c nbc's chief international correspondent, michelle caruso-cabrera is live from cyprus. there's a huge delay. so two questions. first of all, there's a financial crisis, what's going on in cyprus as far as the financial crisis number one. number two, if i find myself in cyprus, where's the best restaurant to go eat dinner? go ahead, michelle. >> reporter: i hope you like, like roasted meat and yogurt and stuff like that, because that's what you're going to find here, a lot of greek food. the situation with the financial crisis here is the following, we're seeing long lines form at the atms of the weakest bank here because there's a lot of rumors that something is going to happen to that bank. right now we're outside of parliament. this is a fight about 5.8
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billion euros. back in june this country went to the european partners and said we need 17 billion euros. they said we've done greece, ireland, portugal. how much more can we do. we'll give you 10 billion. you guys come up with the 7 billion on your own. the way they suggested it because the only place with a lot of money are the banks, the departs of the they said we think you should tax departs. imposing austerity is not going to work here, there's only a million people. this country sdwaedoesn't want this because they're a business model. their business model is to attract deposits here. they pay 4% and 5%. so that's the big fight, how do they come up with that 5.8 billion. they may have to shut down banks. that's why you're seeing lines at the atm. >> so how does this resolve itself over the next week? >> reporter: so the banks are going to be closed at least until tuesday. that's the deadline that the european central bank has said
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to cyprus you better come up with the deal or else we're going to cut off your banks. that means they're not going to fly in cash like they have been doing, they're not going to provide liquidity. if you don't know what that means, it's very simple. the weak banks will fail, they'll get shut down and people will lose a lot of money. that's probably how it's going to end up happening in some form or fashion. the weirdest possible outlier is that cyprus says, you know what, we don't want to do any of this and we're going to leave the euro. i only give that a 20% chance. >> you know, i'm really curious, do you think that the bank runs are going to actually spread throughout europe? because, you know, there's kind of a trust deficit here now. if i was living in spain or italy, i might be thinking about putting my money someplace aside from a shaky bank right now. >> reporter: so the trust deficit stems from the original proposal was that they should tax not just uninsured deposits, but also insured deposits. imagine if you were living in
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the united states and even though we have fdic insurance up to $250,000, you were told that actually you're not going to get all $250,000 of your dollars, they were going to take a piece of that. that was the earlier proposal from earlier this week and that's what they thought would worry the italians and the span yards that they didn't even have insurance protection like they thought they did. that proposal has since been voted down, gone away. the banking situation here is unique compared to italy and spain. it's just so much bigger, it's not really comparable. >> thank you so much, michelle, we greatly appreciate it. and thank you, rona, we appreciate it as well. i think we learned something very important about her consumer habits. she buys wooden blocks from germany. >> that's right. germany. big exporters. >> huge exporter of wooden blocks. i'm not exactly sure why. >> and educational toys. >> did you know that? >> i had no idea. i'm not that familiar with the wooden block industry.
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>> great at exporting -- >> your head is made of wood, you should. >> i was waiting for that. he was setting you up. >> thank you so much. coming up next, an unlikely match that could only be made on broadway. acclaimed rock and roll guitarist trey anastasio joins forces for an exciting new musical. incredible reviews. that's coming up next on "morning joe." as your life changes, fidelity is there for your personal economy, helping you readjust along the way, refocus as careers change and kids head off to college,
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>> that was a scene from the musical "hands on a hardbody." with us is the show's play wright, doug wright, the composer, trey anastasio, whose mom is watching the show. also a founding member of the band fish. it's great to see you guys. so this is a documentary. >> it's based on a documentary, yeah. >> originally. and talk about the documentary and the story behind that. >> in 1995 this filmmaker s.r. bindler shot a competition in east texas where contestants were invited to come to a nissan dealership, place their hands on a truck and whoever could stand there the longest without taking their hand off won it and drove it off the list. she shot this in '95 and it was released in '97. >> so what pharmaceuticals were you on when you said this was a
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great idea for a musical? where did the lightning strike you and when did you come up with this idea? it's amazing. >> there are quirky ideas for musicals. a homicidal barber in 19th century england, and gang wars in "west side story." >> this is just fewer deflection. >> amanda and i both felt that these characters had a lot to sing about. and together they composed some remarkable songs to give them a voice. >> yeah, they just -- their needs were great. nobody is around the truck for sport. it goes on for -- i think the original contest was 87 hours. it's a cross section of race, religion, color, age, you know, from a 20-year-old to a 70-year-old. and everybody needs that truck. and it's such a -- you know, it's a metaphor for the american dream and survival of the fittest. it starts out absurd because you're like what's the sport, you go like this.
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but, you know, 16 hours into it, you just desperately want everyone to win that truck. >> so i was asking how you came up with this idea. you're like straight out of broadway. you're not straight out of broadway. how did this happen? how did you guys come together? >> we met through a mutual friend and started writing songs, just songs. >> oh, really? >> we actually live three blocks away from each other. >> oh, okay. that will do it. >> and we were having a great time writing songs and amanda asked me to join the team, the hardbody team and so off we went. >> what's it been like? >> it's been thrilling. >> i mean the difference especially from being in a band to now doing this? >> very different. well, it's been a roller coaster ride. it's a gigantic team of people working together. you work six days a week, all day long.
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it's thrilling. >> it's a lot different than hey, dude, why don't we go here. >> as people know, phish is a iconic jam band. you're famous for the almost endless improvisational, aloof, shaggy, baggy kind of musical. >> the music takes itself. one look here, like let's go this way and you go off in another direction. >> musical theater is not improvisational, it's very tight and disciplined and everything has to move the story forward. so how did you find that transition from going from mega loose and improvisational and really tight all the time. >> i'm a big musical theater fan, i've always gone to the theater, my whole life. so it was a bit of a boyhood dream to work on a show. so i was ready for that. maybe not to the degree that it's very, very specific. if someone takes a step to the left, the music has to reflect that.
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>> was it hard explaining it to him? >> not at all, no. >> that's how you're supposed to answer. i guess i have to ask you off camera. but he was a quick study? >> he was a quick study. we were off and running from the first day we tackled the opening number. if you write muz csicals, you k that's the most difficult number and trey was like let's do it. we were off to the races and coming up with music and i was running after him trying to write lyrics. he'd come up with something beautiful and i'd say but the actors are standing there so no time for the lick. he's like right, okay. but trey is an enter tatainer a very -- >> jazz and jazz was -- if you ever saw "gypsy" when jazz was the great american art form, you know, at the same time it was popular music and high art and
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it made it to the stage -- musical theater stage, the broadway stage. >> could i ask you what it was like the first time you were sitting in rehearsals and the first time you heard what was in your head produced in front of you. it's much different being on stage, playing, looking out and sitting back there and looking at all of these people putting your music to life. >> it's the singers, the actors, the voices. they sing so incredibly well. you can write these giant 12-voice chords and it comes back. you know, tears streaming down. >> i like the fact that i'm looking at the video here, i'm looking at that tie-dyed t-shirt thinking maybe it's not such a strange marriage. >> so great reviews. you've got to be thrilled. >> we've been very fortunate. with our team, neil and sergio, our choreographer, it's kind of a dream production. we text each other at all hours
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of the night going we're living it, we're living it, this is our baby. >> phish, you guys have been around 30 years. it's been a long time since the last album. so when are we going to see some new phish action? >> we're starting an album now -- tomorrow. >> tomorrow? >> there you go. >> all the phish fans of this show will be rejoicing. >> and we have tons of phish fans watching this morning. actually it's night for them. and mom too. thank your mom for watching us and your husband. the show "hands on a hardbody" opens tonight on broadway. we've got to go. we've got to go see that. doug, thank you. amanda, trey, thanks so much, we appreciate it. good luck. i know you don't need it, it's going to be great. we'll be right back. [ female announcer ] it balances you...
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you asked joe biden, if you can call him joe, is that right? >> mm-hmm. >> shall i address you as governor. you served only half a term. so what's the right term of address? >> well, i'll tell you, i don't know. and i'm a half governor or you could call me a maverick at large. >> same-sex marriage, what is your view on that, please? >> well, the bible says it's gross.
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marriage is meant for people who wear different kinds of swimsuits. >> what do you think of tina fey's portrayal of you? >> it's the best one i never watched. >> that was tina fey going inside the studio as sarah palin. coming up on tomorrow's show we have rnc chairman rients priebus. and coming up next, what, if anything, did we learn today. [ man ] i got this citi thankyou card and started earning loads of points. we'll leave that there. you got a weather balloon, with points? yes i did. [ man ] points i could use for just about anything. go.
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to reduce the risk of an afib-related stroke. there is limited data on how these drugs compare when warfarin is well managed. no routine blood monitoring means bob can spend his extra time however he likes. new zealand! xarelto® is just one pill a day, taken with the evening meal. and with no dietary restrictions, bob can eat the healthy foods he likes. do not stop taking xarelto® rivaroxaban without talking to the doctor who prescribes it for you. stopping may increase your risk of having a stroke. get medical help right away if you develop any signs or symptoms of bleeding, like unusual bruising or tingling. you may have a higher risk of bleeding if you take xarelto® with aspirin products, nsaids or blood thinners. talk to your doctor before taking xarelto® if you currently have abnormal bleeding. xarelto® can cause bleeding, which can be serious, and rarely may lead to death. you are likely to bruise more easily on xarelto®, and it may take longer for bleeding to stop. tell your doctors you are taking xarelto®

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